Extroverts (and introverts, too) face quarantine challenges
Within days, Vicktery Zimmerman had figured out how to connect with friends and family even as she and her husband shelter in place at their Chicago home.
Stranded cruise ship hit by virus begs Florida to dock
MIAMI (AP) — As a cruise ship stranded at sea with dozens sick and four dead makes for Florida, passengers who have been confined to their rooms for more than a week are anxious for relief, hoping Gov.
'Staggering': New York virus death toll rises above 1,200
NEW YORK (AP) — A Navy hospital ship with 1,000 beds arrived Monday in New York City as the number of deaths in the state from the coronavirus outbreak climbed quickly.
Ex-Blackfeet chairman gets 10 months prison in fraud case
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A former Blackfeet Nation chairman who defrauded a tribal Head Start early education program through an overtime pay scheme was sentenced Monday to 10 months in prison and his plea to be spared prison time because of the coronavirus was denied.
Conditions for companies that get virus aid: Room for abuse?
WASHINGTON (AP) — A $500 billion federal aid package for companies and governments hurt by the coronavirus includes rules aimed at ensuring that the taxpayer money is used in ways that would help sustain the economy.
Grandparenting goes digital as virus keeps older adults home
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A few weeks ago, Debbie Cameron saw her grandsons most days, playing the piano, making after-school snacks or singing nursery rhymes with the baby in her Chandler, Arizona, home.
Yellowstone slaughters wild bison to shrink park's herds
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Yellowstone National Park is done capturing wild bison for the year after rounding up almost 550 of the wild animals and sending most to slaughter as part of a population control program, park officials said.
Hay fever or virus? For allergy sufferers, a season of worry
HAMBURG, Pa. (AP) — The spring breezes of 2020 are carrying more than just tree pollen. There’s a whiff of paranoia in the air. For millions of seasonal allergy sufferers, the annual onset of watery eyes and scratchy throats is bumping up against the global spread of a new virus that produces its own constellation of respiratory symptoms.
Rent strike idea gaining steam during coronavirus crisis
ST. LOUIS (AP) — With millions of people suddenly out of work and rent due at the first of the month, some tenants are vowing to go on a rent strike until the coronavirus pandemic subsides.
Gray hair, don't care: Cuts and color lead to home travails
NEW YORK (AP) — Sister love playing out in a living-room hair trim. A botched home dye job with a silver lining. Stylists shipping out kits of personalized color with promises to talk their regulars through the process via FaceTime.
Ill man seeks return to US amid West Bank virus restrictions
Ismail “Sam” Mousa is very worried. The 48-year-old Uber driver and Subway worker from Delaware has chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which means contracting the coronavirus could be deadly for him.
Hawaii mountain telescopes close in response to virus order
HONOLULU (AP) — Observatories on Hawaii's tallest mountain have shut down operations in response to the governor's stay-at-home order aimed at preventing the spread of the coronavirus.
Father-son photo taken days before tornado destroys home
JONESBORO, Ark. (AP) — Three days after a photo posted on Facebook showed an Arkansas doctor looking through a glass door to see his 1-year-old son crawl for the first time, the family's home in Jonesboro was destroyed by a tornado.
How would overwhelmed hospitals decide who to treat first?
NEW YORK (AP) — A nurse with asthma, a grandfather with cancer and a homeless man with no known family are wracked with coronavirus-induced fevers.
What you need to know today about the virus outbreak
President Donald Trump is bracing the nation for a death toll that could exceed 100,000 people. Trump extended restrictive social distancing guidelines through April, bowing to public health experts who presented him with even more dire projections for the expanding coronavirus pandemic.
What to know about the coronavirus numbers in New York
NEW YORK (AP) — The official statistics reported by health authorities would seem to show that the United States has more coronavirus infections than any other country and that the New York caseloads exceed any other state.
New York state surpasses 1,000 coronavirus deaths
NEW YORK (AP) — New York state's death toll from the coronavirus outbreak climbed Sunday above 1,000, less than a month after the first known infection in the state.
In virus times, have Americans found a shared experience?
As an uneasy March unspooled, as coronavirus dread descended upon the United States, it became commonplace — and, for public figures, quite practical — to point out how, unlike most major events in the 21st century, this was an unusually communal moment.
Hundreds at Louisiana church flout COVID-19 gatherings ban
CENTRAL, La. (AP) — Hundreds of worshippers attended services at a Louisiana church on Sunday, flouting a ban on large gatherings, angering neighbors and seemingly turning a deaf ear to their governor, who once again warned that hospitals could soon be overwhelmed with new cases of the coronavirus.
Legislatures meet remotely, limit public as virus spreads
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Members of the Arkansas House met in a college basketball arena, spaced out among 5,600 seats, as they voted on ways to cover a budget shortfall caused by the coronavirus punch to the economy.
Relief package billions can't buy hospitals out of shortages
The billions of tax dollars headed for hospitals and states as part of the $2.2 trillion coronavirus response bill won't fix the problem facing doctors and nurses: a critical shortage of protective gowns, gloves and masks.
A missing boy and a freezing swamp test tracker's instincts
EDGERTON, Wis. (AP) — Austin Schumacher parked his unmarked squad truck and watched pheasant hunters work their way into the woods under the overcast, late-fall sky.
Largest US dam removal stirs debate over coveted West water
KLAMATH, Calif. (AP) — The second-largest river in California has sustained Native American tribes with plentiful salmon for millennia, provided upstream farmers with irrigation water for generations and served as a haven for retirees who built dream homes along its banks.
Pizzeria borrows to keep workers on job, spurs donations
BELMAR, N.J. (AP) — This is a story about bosses and their workers, in the dark days of COVID-19. It’s also a story about how one good turn deserves another and yet another.